360 Degree Firewire/USB 3.0 Cameras by PointGrey

Link

Point Grey has several spherical cameras available both with USB and Firewire interfaces.

Ladybug 5 USB 3.0

Ladybug-5

Sensor: Six 2/3″ 5MP Sony CCDs, Color
Resolution: 30 megapixels using six 2048×2448 CCDs
Frame Rate: 10FPS at full resolution
Interface: USB 3.0
Compression: Embedded JPEG image compression
Calibration: Provides high quality spherical image stitching
Mechanics: Single unit construction, water resistant
Colors: Anodized Red

Ladybug 3 1394b

ladybug-3

Sensor:Six 1/1.8″ 2MP Sony CCDs, Color
Resolution: 12 megapixels using six 1600×1200 CCDs
Frame Rate: 15FPS at full resolution
Interface: 800Mb/sec 1394b interface with locking connector
Compression: Embedded JPEG image compression
Calibration: Provides high quality spherical image stitching
Mechanics: Single unit construction, water resistant
Colors: Anodized Red or Anodized Black

Ladybug 2 1394b

ladybug-2

Sensor:Six Sony 1/3″ progressive scan CCD, Color
Resolution: 1024×768
Frame Rate: 1024×768 at 30FPS
Interface: 800Mb/sec 1394b interface with locking connector
Compression: JPEG image compression via Compressor
CalibrationProvides high quality spherical image stitching
Lensesix (6) 2.5mm focal length high quality micro lenses
Colors: Anodized Red
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

AR Driver Assistance – The Transparent Bonnet

transparent-bonet

The British all-terrain vehicle maker Land Rover has found a practical application for Augmented Reality. They are developing a driver assist system that creates a virtual transparent bonnet/hood.

Several cameras in the grill capture the ground below the forward part of the car. The combined images of these cameras are projected onto a head-up display in the lower half of the windshield allowing to “look through” the bonnet/hood and motor block onto the ground.

The application is supposed to assist the driver in difficult situations for example steep climbs or when maneuvering in confined spaces. Additionally the application displays information about important vehicle data, including speed, incline, roll angle, steering position, and drive mode.

The concept study dubbed “Discovery Vision Concept” will be shown at the New York International Auto Show.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

Another Step Towards Live Satellite Maps

The next step in the race towards “live” maps seems to be public satellite, or ISS, based near realtime HD video. The footage below is from Skybox Imaging, a company that has just started offering customers 90-second video of any point on Earth from its SkySat-1 satellite. In this clip, the SkyBox video sits on top of a static layer of satellite imagery and is overlaid by a map layer from Mapbox, based on OpenStreetMap.

Another company, Planet Labs, has just launched its own fleet of 28 imaging microsatellites from the International Space Station and hopes to offer scientists and the public the chance to track changes on the Earth’s surface with much higher frequency than ever before. These satellites will only provide still images though.

Yet another company, Urthecast, recently successfully deployed their cameras to the International Space Station with a planned beta launch of their partly free service later this year. First images of the medium resolution camera are already available.

Also NASA seems to be willing to ride the wave by putting up four off the shelf HD cameras outside the ISS for the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) project. The cameras will be insulated but not shielded against radiation. One of the projects goals is to find out what camera copes best with the radiation.

[Update] Recently found this more comprehensive list of players in this race on ieee.spectrum.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

Four HD Cameras for the ISS

With the SpaceX Dragon 3 capsule that was recently berthed to the ISS, NASA deployed the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) experiment to space. It consists of four of the shelf HD video cameras in a common housing with a video encoder and router.

Today ISSs robotic arm extracted the box from the Dragons unpressurized cargo hold and mounted it outside of the Columbus module.

Direct link to the Ustream page.

Live stream showing video of all four cameras in a predefined sequence.

The four cameras are mounted so that one camera is pointing forward into the stations velocity vector, two cameras to the back and one down towards the earth.
The housing insulates the cameras from the extreme temperatures and vacuum of space but will provide no significant shielding against radiation. That’s on purpose as the main reason for the experiment is to find out how none radiation hardened cameras, especially their sensors, will fare in this environment.

The video signal is encoded to a H264 stream for the downlink and broadcasted live on a ustream channel. The stream will show all four installed cameras in a preprogrammed sequence.

This is an interesting contribution in the race towards live satellite maps, several companies are now taking part in, as the possibility to use off the shelf camera would definitely limit the costs for such ventures.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone