An interactive timeline of history

events

Histography is an amazing interactive timeline of every single historical event that’s there is information for on Wikipedia. So that is pretty much everything from the big bang up until today.

Each dot on the timeline represents an event. You can also use the scrollbar at the bottom tho move through timeframes like the Stone Age or the Renaissance.

If only specific events from a particular period interest you it’s possible to filter by category.

Histography is a final year project by Matan Stauber at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem.

Histography currently only works on Chrome and Safari.

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A Map Of The Internet

internet-map.net shows a zoomable map of the internet based on Alexa traffic measurements. The Internet map is a bi-dimensional presentation of links between websites every site is a circle on the map with its size determined by website traffic, the larger the amount of traffic, the bigger the circle. Users’ switching between websites forms links, and the stronger the link, the closer the websites tend to arrange themselves to each other.

internet-map

The data it is based on is a snapshot of the global network as of the end of 2011 (however, balloons show actual statistics from Alexa). It encompasses over 350 thousand websites from 196 countries and all domain zones. Information about more than 2 million links between the websites has joined some of them together into topical clusters. As one might have expected, the largest clusters are formed by national websites, i.e. sites belonging to one country. For the sake of convenience, all websites relative to a certain country carry the same color.

info-imap

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Distributed Sensor Data

A startup offers feeds for thousands of sensor devices—and wants others to open up their data, too.

Distributed wireless sensors are increasingly being used to monitor all sorts of things—from water quality in a river to the oven in your kitchen. A startup in the U.K. called Pachube wants to kick-start a revolution in new apps and services by providing ways for anyone to share and access all this sensor data.

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Datamining power tool

After purchasing Freebase the public graph database Google has also taken Freebases data mining application Gridbase under its wings. Now named Google Refine it still is a power tool for working with messy data, cleaning it up, transforming it from one format into another, extending and correcting it with web services, and linking it to databases like Freebase.
Version 2.0 has just been announced. While you’re at it. Also have a look at Freebases powerful API that provides access to an amazingly big community build ontology. You can play with it in the Query Editor.

Back on the original topic. There are some introduction videos on Google Refine online:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5ER2qRH1OQ

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