DIY Volumetric Display

Link

A beautiful volumetric display build from a screen rotating at high speed. Interesting idea, I don’t want to be in the room if there is a mechanical failure though.

 

Another take on the volumetric display concept comes from Sony. The prototype  rotates vertical lines of LEDs around its center to form a 3D image.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

Amazing Kinetic Installation

Just recently stumbled upon a video of this amazing kinetic installation called Hyper-Matrix. It was created for the Hyundai Motor Group Exhibition Pavilion in Korea at the 2012 EXPO. The installation consists of a specially made huge steel construction to support thousands of stepper motors that control 320x320mm cubes that project out of the internal facade of the building. The foam cubes are mounted to actuators that move them forward and back by the steppers, creating patterns across the three-sided display.

Comprised of what at first appear to be three blank white walls, Hyper-Matrix installation quickly comes to life as thousands of individual cubic units forming a field of pixels begin to move, pulsate, and form dynamic images across the room, creating infinite number of possibilities in the vertical, 180 degree, landscape. In addition, as the boxes are arranged at only 5mm narrow intervals, the wall can also be a nice moving screen for the images projected on to it.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

Junkyard Jumbotron

A researcher at MIT’s Center for Future Civic Media has developed software that lets anyone quickly stitch together random displays to form what he calls a Junkyard Jumbotron. Using the Junkyard Jumbotron, groups of people can more easily view data, graphics or other information on what is essentially a larger virtual display.

To create the virtual display, a user goes to the Junkyard Jumbotron creation Website to receive a unique URL. This URL is then entered on all the devices that will be used in the virtual display system. Once the URL is entered, each device will display a visual code.

The next step is to take a photo of all the ensemble of displays exhibiting the codes. The photo must then be e-mailed or uploaded to the creation Website. At this point, software developed by the center analyzes the photo to figure out where all the displays are located.

After this step, any image that the user desires to display is simply e-mailed to the site, and the software automatically slices up that image and places pieces on the individual devices. This forms the larger virtual image. A user can them manipulate the image on any device zooming and panning across devices.

The source code of this project is available on github.

This video shows how it works:

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

A Touch Screen with Texture

Touch screens are ubiquitous today. But a common complaint is that the smooth surface just doesn’t feel as good to use as a physical keypad. While some touch-screen devices use mechanical vibrations to enhance users’ experiences of virtual keypads, the approach isn’t widely used, mainly because mechanical vibrations are difficult to implement well, and they often make the entire device buzz in your hand, instead of just a particular spot on the screen.

Now, engineers from three different groups are proposing a type of tactile feedback that they believe will be more popular than mechanical buzzing. Called electrovibration, the technique uses electrical charges to simulate the feeling of localized vibration and friction, providing touch-screen textures that are impossible to simulate using mechanical actuators.

Their touch panel is made of transparent electrodes on a glass plate coated with an insulating layer. By applying a periodic voltage to the electrodes via connections used for sensing a finger’s position on the screen, the researchers were able to effectively induce a charge in a finger dragged along the surface. By changing the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltage, the surface can be made to feel as though it is bumpy, rough, sticky, or vibrating. The major difference is the specially designed control circuit that produces the sensations.

A Finnish company called Senseg has implemented electrovibration in touch screens and closed deals with three companies to incorporate the technology into products.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

Pressuresensitve Multitouch Screens

A clear composite material could make multitouch screens sensitive to pressure. A British company called Peratech has announced a new technology for touch screens that registers pressure as well as the position of a finger. This could provide new ways of interacting with apps for touch screen mobile phones and tablets.

In addition to adding pressure sensitivity to screens, the company claims that the technology, called Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC) Clear, could make touch screens thinner, more rugged, and more energy-efficient.

[ via technologyreview.com ]

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone