An interactive timeline of history

events

Histography is an amazing interactive timeline of every single historical event that’s there is information for on Wikipedia. So that is pretty much everything from the big bang up until today.

Each dot on the timeline represents an event. You can also use the scrollbar at the bottom tho move through timeframes like the Stone Age or the Renaissance.

If only specific events from a particular period interest you it’s possible to filter by category.

Histography is a final year project by Matan Stauber at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem.

Histography currently only works on Chrome and Safari.

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WiFi Based Visitor Tracking

On re:publica 2013 the Berlin based german data designers from OpenDataCity created a wifi tracking network with 100 Access Points that allowed them to visualize the movements of about 6,700 different electronic devices during the conference.

The application called re:log is a dynamic map of the conference location that shows the approximate locations of the devices when they were connected to the local WiFi hotspots. An interactive timeline underneath allows to explore the dynamic changes over time, while a rectangular area can be drawn to more specifically highlight and follow a smaller amount of dots.

The visualization was based on tracking the MAC addresses of the devices according to the WiFi hotspot they were connected to. This data, which can be downloaded, was fully anonymized, yet the authors mention their desire to allow people to look up their own MAC address in the future.

I suspect the solution used is based on MagicMap a free Wifi/Bluetooth tracking architecture developed at the Humboldt-University Berlin. Their Wiki has some more information.

relog-app

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A Map Of The Internet

internet-map.net shows a zoomable map of the internet based on Alexa traffic measurements. The Internet map is a bi-dimensional presentation of links between websites every site is a circle on the map with its size determined by website traffic, the larger the amount of traffic, the bigger the circle. Users’ switching between websites forms links, and the stronger the link, the closer the websites tend to arrange themselves to each other.

internet-map

The data it is based on is a snapshot of the global network as of the end of 2011 (however, balloons show actual statistics from Alexa). It encompasses over 350 thousand websites from 196 countries and all domain zones. Information about more than 2 million links between the websites has joined some of them together into topical clusters. As one might have expected, the largest clusters are formed by national websites, i.e. sites belonging to one country. For the sake of convenience, all websites relative to a certain country carry the same color.

info-imap

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What Makes Paris Look Like Paris?

Researchers from France and the USA have developed an algorithm that analyzes Google-Street-View images looking for visual elements, e.g. windows, balconies, and street signs, that are most distinctive for a certain geo-spatial area.

In their SIGGRAPH paper they describe how this information can be used to develop an architectural footprint of a city or city area and compare Paris, Barcelona, Prague and London

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Interactive Projection Mapping

Projecting onto buildings has become a somehow common thing. I have never seen it combined with interactivity and data visualization though.

Come to your Census[spinifexgroup.com] was developed by Spinifex for the occasion of Vivid Sydney, a spectacular festival around the theme of light which happened about one month ago.

The installation consisted of 3 different parts that visualized several datasets from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The main interactive projection mapping showed data like Age & Gender, Country of Birth, Mode of Transport and Occupation of every postcode in Australia, which then could be interactively steered from a multitouch table in front of it. Another projection mapping displayed a normal infographics-based animation, while several interactive kiosks offered access to the ABS Spotlight website, an infographic story-tellingw website that describes several census statistics from a personal perspective.

[via infosthetics.com|

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Distributed Sensor Data

A startup offers feeds for thousands of sensor devices—and wants others to open up their data, too.

Distributed wireless sensors are increasingly being used to monitor all sorts of things—from water quality in a river to the oven in your kitchen. A startup in the U.K. called Pachube wants to kick-start a revolution in new apps and services by providing ways for anyone to share and access all this sensor data.

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