DIY Volumetric Display

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A beautiful volumetric display build from a screen rotating at high speed. Interesting idea, I don’t want to be in the room if there is a mechanical failure though.

 

Another take on the volumetric display concept comes from Sony. The prototype  rotates vertical lines of LEDs around its center to form a 3D image.

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Amazing Kinetic Installation

Just recently stumbled upon a video of this amazing kinetic installation called Hyper-Matrix. It was created for the Hyundai Motor Group Exhibition Pavilion in Korea at the 2012 EXPO. The installation consists of a specially made huge steel construction to support thousands of stepper motors that control 320x320mm cubes that project out of the internal facade of the building. The foam cubes are mounted to actuators that move them forward and back by the steppers, creating patterns across the three-sided display.

Comprised of what at first appear to be three blank white walls, Hyper-Matrix installation quickly comes to life as thousands of individual cubic units forming a field of pixels begin to move, pulsate, and form dynamic images across the room, creating infinite number of possibilities in the vertical, 180 degree, landscape. In addition, as the boxes are arranged at only 5mm narrow intervals, the wall can also be a nice moving screen for the images projected on to it.

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The V Motion Project

The V Motion Project is a visually powerful Kinect based musical “instrument” that was developed by multiple artists for a marketing campaign.

On the technical side they found a very creative steam punk like solution for the problem of multiple kinects interfering with each other:

Matt Tizard found a white paper and video that explained an ingenious solution: wiggle the cameras. That’s it! Normally, the Kinect projects a pattern of infrared dots into space. An infrared sensor looks to see how this pattern has been distorted, and thus the shape of any objects in front of it. When you’ve got two cameras, they get confused when they see each other’s dots. If you wiggle one of the cameras, it sees its own dots as normal but the other camera’s dots are blurred streaks it can ignore. Paul built a little battery operated wiggling device from a model car kit, and then our Kinects were the best of friends.

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Infinite Jukebox – Sound Loop Generator

A Music Hack Day event in Boston has yielded a funny little web app The Infinite Jukebox creates an infinitely long and ever-changing version of uploaded tracks and visualizes the process.

It also shows how todays chart music material is copy an pasted together in the studio as it performs really well on such material meaning you can’t really hear the cuts. On older tracks, were larger portions of the song are recorded in one take, it doesn’t work that well.

If you want to test. At the moment it only seems to work with Chrome and Safari not with Firefox.

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