Coding for Kinect

If you want to get started with coding for the Kinect and tend to use Microsofts API instead of OpenNi, I highly recommend to have a look at Microsofts Channel 9 – Coding4Fun articles on the Kinect. Lots of practical examples with source code and technical background info there. For all the Webdudes out there they even have examples for a Kinect WebSocket Server: WebSocketing the Kinect with Kinection; Kinect, HTML5, WebSockets and Canvas.

Not all examples have been updated to use the current Kinect for Windows SDK that established a new interface for the Kinect access. So check the dependencies if you want to build one.

Also worth a look is the Kinect for Windows blog.

Procedural Motion Graphics

Proceduralism is a video channel for procedural computer graphics on vimeo. Particle systems, procedural models, and visual effects achieved through custom scripts and software are showcased here, as are interesting visual results and examples of new ideas and technologies.

Some samples:

The Leap: Gesture control like Kinect

A new USB device, called The Leap, by Leap Motion, creates an 8-cubic-feet bubble of “interaction space”. It claims to detect your hand gestures down to an accuracy of 0.01 millimeters — about 200 times more accurate than “existing touch-free products and technologies,” such as your smartphone’s touchscreen… or Microsoft Kinect.

Wireds Gadget Lab had a detailed first look at the device.

The Leap is available for pre-order right now and will ship sometime during the December-through-February time frame. Leap Motion will make an SDK and APIs available to developers, and plans on shipping the first batches of the hardware to developers as well. An application to sign up to be one of the first coders to work with the the Leap is on the company’s site